Paper Wreath Tutorial

Upcycled atlas wreathI thought it was time I created an improved tutorial for my paper cone wreaths. You can find my original tutorial made from vintage sheet music here. These paper wreaths get a lot of attention on my instagram account and they’re not that hard to make. I was delighted last week when I found an old atlas from 1965 for $2 in an op shop. The colours that adorned the pages were so beautiful that I knew it would be my prettiest wreath yet. Of course, you can use whatever paper you prefer – sheet music, golden books, a dictionary or even Christmas paper would all work well. Here’s what you’ll need -

  • paper
  • double sided tape
  • hot glue gun and sticks
  • cardboard
  • scissors
  • stapler
  • lacquer suitable for paper

Vintage atlas pagesStep 1 – cut up your paper. I divided the atlas pages into quarters, measuring 11 x 14cm, so this will be quite a small wreath, but you can use whatever size you prefer. The bigger the page, the bigger the wreath.Paper wreath DIY vintage atlas pagesStep 2 – stick a piece of double sided tape across the bottom of the paper. You can see in the picture that it doesn’t need to go all the way across, but it’s important that it covers the far right corner of the paper.Vintage atlas pagesStep 3 – take your paper and bring the top lefthand corner across the front. Then wrap the top righthand corner around and stick in place to form a cone.Paper wreath Vintage atlas pagesStep 4 – fold under about a 1/4 of the bottom of the cone and then staple it into place.Vintage atlas pagesPaper wreath diyStep 5 – cut off the excess paper. This reduces bulk when you glue your cones together.Paper craft vintage paperStep 6 – make around 60-70 cones. The number of cones needed depends on the size of your wreath.
Step 7 – cut a circle out of cardboard. My circle measures 14cm across.Paper wreathPaper flower tutorialStep 8 – using a hot glue gun, start sticking your cones to the circle of cardboard. I like to place cones marking four quarters and then fill in the gaps with equal numbers of cones. This helps to create a uniform and symmetrical wreath. In the picture below you can see the first round completed.Paper wreathStep 9 – continue to attach your paper cones round by round. The number of rounds depends on the size of your wreath.
Paper wreath tutorial

Paper cone wreath

Getting close now…

Paper flower tutorial

Almost there

Step 10 – once you reach the centre of the wreath, you may find it tricky to fit the paper cones in place. Don’t be afraid to cut more length off your cones to help them to fit into place. Ta da! All finished.

Paper cone wreath DIY

All finished!

Step 11 – I like to spray my completed wreaths with a couple of coats of lacquer to make the paper more durable.

DIY paper wreath

 

How to create great gallery walls

 

wall pennant diy

A large central print with smaller items hung at the side.

There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to creating gallery walls, but I find a few gentle guidelines can make the difference between an ordinary gallery wall and an extraordinary one. I don’t like too many rules, especially for interiors because it make a home seem contrived and a bit cold, but I think these tips are helpful for anyone who isn’t confident enough to let loose! Here are my three main tips and some images of my own gallery walls -

Tips gallery walls

Gold frames help to tie this gallery wall together

Tip #1 – Unity :  I like to have an element that ties all the pieces together whether it be colour, subject,  frame or shape etc. For example, a cluster of unique frames work well when they are all the same colour. In the parlour at the guesthouse I’ve used all gold frames to tie everything together. And below, our family portraits are in a variety frames,  but the tones and colours in the photographs are similar which makes the cluster work.

vintage wooden crate ideas

Family portraits in similar colours and tones

Tip #2 – Organise by size : if you have items of varying sizes it’s best to have the larger items towards the centre with smaller frames or pictures tapering off at the edges. This rule doesn’t always apply,  but it is definitely easier to achieve balance if you arrange your items this way. In the gold bedroom at RedAgape Guesthouse I’ve hung a large oil painting over the bed, in the centre of the wall, with smaller frames and items around this central painting.

layering interior design

The Gold Bedroom at RedAgape Guesthouse – layered with lamps, books and pictures

Gallery wall

A large central framed oil painting with smaller frames tapering off around the edges.

Tip #3 – Balance : A poorly composed gallery wall will look and feel awkward. There are a couple of ways to achieve balance – symmetrically or asymmetrically. Try to arrange your items on the floor until they feel right or alternatively, use cardboard or paper to represents your items and blue tac them to the wall. If you are unsure, check out my Pinterest board on gallery walls for layouts that you can reproduce.

navy bedroom tufted headboard

Symmetrically arranged vintage prints above a bedhead at RedAgape Guesthouse.

Teen bedroom gallery wall

Gallery wall in my daughter’s room

I love gallery walls and can’t recommend them enough. They can inject lots of life and personality into a room. So take the plunge and give a gallery wall a go! :)

DIY Headboard at RedAgape Guesthouse

navy bedroom tufted headboardI was really excited to finally hang my DIY tufted headboard on the wall in the navy room at RedAgape Guesthouse. You can find the tutorial here if you are keen to make one for yourself. It is a challenging project but well worth the time and energy, as it is so cost effective when compared with buying a new headboard. 
beige headboard DIY bedhead tutorial beige bedhead navy room navy red beige bedroomYou can find more images of  RedAgape Guesthouse in my Instagram feed or my FaceBook page. :)

 

International Crochet Day

7 vignettes learning crochetThe 12th of September is International Crochet Day! A massive thank you to @crochetgirl99 for introducing me to the joy of crochet. You can follow her on IG here. And I’m pleased to report that I’m producing granny squares that no longer look sad and wonky (see above). Happy Crochet Day!! xoxo

happy crochet

Colourful Crochet Stars

international crochet day

Mollie Makes print

international crochet day

Mega Granny Square

international crochet day

White crochet coaster

DIY Diamond Tufted Headboard using Pegboard

tufted upholstered diy headboardI have just completed my DIY diamond tufted headboard and it looks great! Following is a tutorial and recount of my emotional journey ;) that lead to the creation of a tufted headboard that is a fraction of the price of a bought one. I won’t lie, this has been my most challenging DIY yet. Don’t be fooled by the feminine curves of the tufting or the inviting soft plumps of foam, this project was a bitch! That said, it was so worth it!! I’m so relieved that it turned out well and my button to button method (explained below) worked beautifully for a beginner at upholstery. I challenge you to give this a go! It’s so rewarding. Anyway, here we go – diy tufted headboard pegboard

You will need -
Pegboard cut to size. The measurements will depend on what style and size you need.
3inch foam the same size as the pegboard
Batting – the same size as the pegboard with an additional 6inches all the way around
Fabric – same amount as the batting
Extra fabric for buttons
Upholstery thread – NOT regular cotton (trust me it won’t work)
Button making supplies – I needed 51
Staple gun
Buttons for backing – 51
Upholstery needlediy tufted headboard pegboardStep 1 – mark out where you want the tufts to be on the pegboard by circling around the holes. My tufts were about 6inches apart but you may prefer to have them closer or further apart depending on the look you want to achieve. Start marking the holes in the centre of the board so that the tufts are symmetrical. I drew up the pattern of diamonds when I was finished so that I could see they were all positioned correctly.
diy tufted headboard pegboardStep 2 – lie the pegboard on the foam and using a sharpie draw through the holes to mark the pattern onto the foam. You should be able to see the marks clearly on the foam. diy tufted headboard pegboardtufted-upholstered-diyStep 3 – using an old knife cut out a square section of foam where marked. Don’t be scared to cut out a decent amount of foam as this will make the tufting process easier and make sure the hole goes all the way through. This is the secret to nice deep tufts. diy tufted headboard pegboardStep 4 – layer up your headboard : pegboard, foam, batting and then fabric. Make sure the marked side of the pegboard is facing out at the back (so you can see where the tufts will be) and that the batting and fabric are nice and smooth with no bubbles. tufted-headboard-tutorial-stepsStep 5 – using the extra fabric make enough buttons to complete your tufts. This process takes and while, so be patient. Warning – your thumbs will be sore….very sore.fabric buttons for upholsteryStep 6 – let the tufting begin!! I’ve seen some tutorials where a staple gun is used to secure the upholstery thread in place. I tried it and I didn’t like it….at all. I found it difficult and really messy looking, so I tried a new method using some old buttons. I’m calling it the ‘button to button’ method. The pretty fabric covered button is on display at the front and any old four hole button secures the tuft at the back. Thread your upholstery needle, double it over and tie the ends in a knot. Thread the needle through the four hole button and then through the middle of the two threads. I went around a few times for added strength.tuftedheadboard-upholstery diy tufted headboard pegboardStep 7 – start at the top in the centre and work your way out to the edges. Insert the needle through the marked hole at the back and out the front through the foam, batting and fabric. Pull your thread tight so the button at the back is over the hole. At the front, ease the fabric into a point and then attached your fabric button. tuftedheadboard-diy-tuftStep 8 – Take the needle back though the foam and pegboard. Don’t go through the exact same position or your fabric might tear. I tried to leave about 1/2 cm between the exit and entry point.  Sounds easy right! Wrong. :( sometimes the needle went straight through and out the exact hole and other times it took an eternity to find the right route back through the foam. Patience is the key. I was pretty patient, surprisingly patient (especially given I was premenstrual) up until the last couple of rows. Then the cursing started….and it didn’t stop until the last button. Thank goodness the kids were at school. :)DIY headboard using pegboardStep 9 – Alright, once your needle is back out through the same hole it entered it’s time to secure your tuft. Apply pressure to your fabric button while pulling tight on the upholstery thread. Insert the needle under the thread in the button and knot tightly. I repeated this about three times for each button to make sure it was properly secure. Stand back and admire. diy tufted headboard pegboardtufted-headboard-tutorialStep 10 – Now repeat steps 6,7,8 and 9 about 51 times (it felt like about 1000 times). It’s agony….really. I must have stabbed myself a hundred times with the needle, the thread almost cut a slice out of my hand and all of my muscles ached from wresting with the foam and buttons. I totally underestimated how physical this task would be. When that last button was secured I’m pretty sure I heard a choir of angels singing and I may have cried a little. Post tufting euphoria! Cursing over. :) Happy days! tutorial for tufted headboardStep 11 – staple the fabric firmly over the pegboard making sure your corners are nice and tidy. Try to keep the tension the same all the way around. Trim off the excess fabric and batting. I’m planning on covering the entire back surface with a piece of felt or fleece to stop the buttons rubbing on the wall once it’s hung. diy tufted bedhead pegboardHere are a couple of shots in my room at home. The headboard will go to the guesthouse next week and I’ll be sure to post some pics of it at it’s new home. I’m convinced now that I want to make one for my bedroom at home, but I’m going to wait about 6 months, maybe have some counselling and physiotherapy before I started the next one. :) pegboard bedhead tuftedtufted headboard pegboard

My DIY Paper Wreaths

paper cone wreath

Paper Cone Wreath made from a vintage atlas

Some of my paper wreaths are now available for sale at Tomolly in Millthorpe. Please pop in and see the lovely Belinda at Tomolly if you’d like to check them out in person. Currently, i have two golden book wreaths and one vintage sheet music wreath available. You can also follow Belinda on Instagram or FB if you’d like to see what she has in stock.

paper cone wreath

Paper Cone Wreath Made from Vintage Golden Books

paper craft

Paper Craft –  Vintage Music Paper Cone Wreath

Paper Wreath

Close up of Vintage Atlas Paper Wreath

Vintage Sheet Music Paper Wreath

Paper Cone Wreath made from Vintage Sheet Music

paper craft wreath

Golden Book Paper Wreath – image by Belinda from Tomolly

Gallery Walls – Progress in the Parlour

 

layering with cushions

The Parlour at RedAgape Guesthouse

Gosh I love a good gallery wall! I have a slight obsession with them and have included them in the guesthouse and my own home. Painting the parlour walls this deep rich navy was one of the best decisions I’ve made at the house. The room was smallish and dark and rather than fight against the natural moodiness,  I decided to embrace it. It’s surprising how the dark walls make the room feel welcoming, cosy and warm. I began planning a gallery wall against the navy base even before I’d picked the paint colour. And gold seemed like the natural choice.

layering interior design

The Gold Bedroom at RedAgape Guesthouse

I have a small gallery wall featuring gold in one of the bedrooms too, which means I have to split my gold framed finds between to the two spaces. Neither wall is complete yet, but that’s ok because I love how each wall is growing and evolving. Over the weekend I went treasure hunting again for gold frames. flower oil painting gallery wallThis pretty oil painting framed in gold was a stand out during my treasure hunt. It’s so pretty and feminine. I did find another larger framed oil painting of flowers, which was stunning, but the budget didn’t allow it this time. Pictured below is the progress so far. What do you think?
dark wall gallery wall

DIY Wall Pennant – stitched or painted

wall pennant diyThese little DIY felt wall pennants are a great way to use up some of your excess craft supplies. I’ve been trying to be good and not purchase anymore craft supplies, which can sometimes be as much as a hobby as the crafting itself. Craft addicts – I know you understand! I didn’t need to purchase a single thing for this project. Yay! :)

You’ll need – flat felt, rotary cutter, scissors, thread, needle, paint and dowel.

1 – First, cut out a rectangle from the felt. The size is up to you and depends on how big you want your pennant to be. My rectangle is 7×9 inches.  Fold your rectangle in half and cut a triangle at a diagonal (see fig 1) about a third of the way up the felt.

2 – Unfold your felt and you can see the result. Felt is a great fabric for this project because the edges won’t fray, so you don’t need to worry about hemming them.

3 – Fold the top section of your rectangle down about an inch and pin. Then stitch in place (by machine or hand). This is where you’ll insert the dowel.

4 – In this image you can see how your pennant will look with the top stitched down. There’s plenty of room for the dowel, or if you want a more rustic look you can use a branch or stick.diy felt wall pennant

5 – Stencils and paint are a quick and easy way to decorate a pennant.  You can used a sponge or brush to apply the paint.

6 – I used a brush and stencil for the star pennant. I found using a brush produced sharper edges than the sponge.

7 –  You can always paint free hand onto the felt if you’re feeling brave. I’m no artist so I prefer stencils, but I did manage to paint the word LOVE onto one pennant without too much drama.

8 – I decorated the last two pennants with white stitching. I used white embroidery thread and a simple back stitch to hand sew crossing arrows on this pennant.

felt pennants wall hangings

9 – I used the same embroidery thread to stitch the word ‘love’ on the last pennant.

10 – Next, cut some 5mm square dowel to size and then pierce a hole through either end to attach the thread. The dowel I used is from Spotlight and it is really soft, which made it perfect for this method. If the the dowel or stick is too firm to pierce, you could just wrap the string around and tie it in place.

11 – If you are using the threaded method, thread the string through the hole and then tie a knot to keep your thread from pulling through.

12 – Because the pennants are so light weight you can attached them to the wall with washi tape. No more holes in the wall. :)

diy wall pennant

My Favourite Images of RedAgape Guesthouse and My Home

dining table styling

My Home – dining table styled with candles, antlers and flowers

world map in office

My office….when it’s tidy.

Monochrome pink and gold bedroom interiors

My cheap and cheerful bedroom

layering in interior design

My favourite bedroom at RedAgape Guesthouse

layering with cushions

The Parlour at RedAgape Guesthouse

Recycling old copper pots

My dining table at home

Gallery wall for girls bedroom

My daughter’s gallery wall at home

Teen bedroom gallery wall

Gallery wall in my daughter’s room

styling with vintage maps

My kitchen at home…plus an awesome vintage map

using vintage maps in interiors

My son’s room – with an awesome vintage map

Bookcase sorted by colour

My colour coded bookcase at home